From training a sales team to using the latest in selling technologies, John Rossi of YSU covers all the bases in Sales 101 to help business owners employ a more evolved selling process to meet today’s business demands.

John Rossi, YSU Marketing Faculty

John Rossi, is a marketing lecturer and the director of The Professional Sales Center in the Williamson College of Business Administration at Youngstown State University. He is a subject matter expert in enterprise valuation and business advisory services and serves a wide range of local, regional and national commercial, institutional, and industrial clients. Email questions and comments to sales101@business-journal.com.

Firms Must Train Sales Professionals to Succeed

The character of a sales force and its role in executing a firm’s marketing strategy are related to the skills, aptitudes and performance of its salesmen.

Building a competent and knowledgeable sales force and providing training about their industry, markets and the products and services they offer is critical to the long-term success of any business enterprise.

Truly professional salesmen often have a personal need to succeed and want to achieve results for themselves and for their firm. Sales professionals naturally love to compete.

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Firms Must Train Sales Professionals to Succeed

The character of a sales force and its role in executing a firm’s marketing strategy are related to the skills, aptitudes and performance of its salesmen.

Building a competent and knowledgeable sales force and providing training about their industry, markets and the products and services they offer is critical to the long-term success of any business enterprise.

Truly professional salesmen often have a personal need to succeed and want to achieve results for themselves and for their firm. Sales professionals naturally love to compete.

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Mission Possible: Listening to Customers Is Critical to Success.

When you made your most recent sales call, who did the most talking? You? Or the customer?

Research shows that in the most successful sales calls, it’s the buyer who does most of the talking. So how do you get the buyer to talk? By asking questions, of course. But not just any questions.

It has been customary in sales training courses and seminars to begin with two types of questions, open-ended and closed-ended. Closed-ended questions normally can be answered in a word or two. Often it’s either “Yes” or “No.” However, you can easily see that this type of question and its subsequent responses provide limited information and minimal insight into the buyer’s needs, problem or situation.

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Sales 101: Proactive Sales Management is a Game Changer

Once again the Youngstown Business Journal has done a great job gathering and recounting stories of our community’s many successful and growing companies for this year’s Growth Report. Even in this climate of rapid change and economic uncertainty you’ll find that upon reading the many profiles the outlook for most organizations remains positive and upbeat.

In our own personal lives, change and uncertainty are becoming a significant part of what we think about regularly and what we respond to daily. Businesses are no different. However, in business and commerce some things remain constant — salesmanship is one of those constants and becoming more important than ever in light of the change and uncertainty. Recall the old adage, “Nothing happens until somebody sells something.” (more…)


Sales 101: How Technology Is Revolutionizing Sales

Did you ever want to smash your computer or toss your mobile device across the room? Me too. Many times.

One of my all-time favorite office cartoons is “Duck Smashing a Computer.” It exemplified the human condition, regardless of position or industry, of being continually frustrated with and by technology.

I have yet to see a similar cartoon that accurately represents the shockingly short tolerance we have for our device’s seemingly slow response.

Remember, it wasn’t that long ago we waited minutes for our modems to respond. Now it is only seconds  – even less  – and we still act just as frustrated as “the Duck.”

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Sales 101: The Art of Selling

When was the last time you saw a matchbook? It’s been a while, right? Smokers tend to flick their Bics and smoking is somewhat taboo these days.

The matchbook was invented in 1889 by Joshua Pusey, a cigar-smoking patent lawyer in Philadelphia. The idea didn’t catch on until 1892 when a salesman, Henry C. Traute, made the matchbook usable and safe by putting the striking surface on the outside.

It was Traute who introduced the idea of the matchbook as an advertising medium and sold it to advertisers, manufacturers and retailers to use as a promotional giveaway. In 1897, a New York City opera company put its logo on matchbooks and distributed them widely to advertise its opening performance. After that, as they say, the rest is history. Demand for matchbooks grew exponentially.

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